Laura Spencer as Emily Sweeney (recurring seasons 7–8, 10, starring season 9):[55] A dermatologist at Huntington Hospital. Emily went to Harvard and delights in the macabre and states that she likes her job because she can cut things with knives. Prior to meeting Raj, Emily was set up on a blind date with Howard. After finding Emily's online dating profile, Raj has Amy contact her as his wingman instead. Their relationship becomes exclusive, but Raj later breaks up with Emily when he becomes infatuated with the bartender Claire (Alessandra Torresani).
Sheldon is still despondent over the disproving of his and Amy's theory on asymmetry. Leonard brings out a VHS tape of a pep talk that Sheldon recorded as a boy, but it turns out that his father had recorded a long-ago football game over it. Sheldon, however, is buoyed by a halftime pep talk his father gave the team, realizing he and his father had more in common than he previously thought. This causes Amy to view asymmetry and symmetry in another manner and they decide their theory may not be dead after all. Bernadette finds an old tape of Howard preparing to audition for The Magic Castle. She insists he fulfill his dream and audition with her as a coach, drawing on her beauty pageant experience. Howard eventually decides to audition his own way, and promptly botches his chances by accidentally destroying a judge's Rolex.

The scene is all business – at least as much as you can expect from a bunch of cut-ups making a sitcom – and no one seems distracted by two significant events: The episode will mark the show’s 276th, moving it past “Cheers” to set a record for a sitcom filmed in front of a studio audience, and only three more remain to be shot for "Big Bang," co-created by Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady. 
Simon Helberg as Howard Wolowitz:[45] An aerospace engineer who got his Masters at MIT. Howard is Jewish and lived with his mother, Debbie (Carol Ann Susi). Unlike Sheldon, Leonard, Raj, Bernadette and Amy, Howard does not hold a doctorate. He goes into space, training as an astronaut and serving as a payload specialist. Howard initially fancies himself as a womanizer, but he later starts dating Bernadette, and they get engaged and married. Howard also has a tendency to waste money on toys and argues with Bernadette because of his oddly low income as an engineer and her high income as a pharmaceutical biochemist.
As Sheldon and Amy start to plan their wedding, they use decision theory to limit the stress of choosing between their competing visions for the big day. After they begin to question each other’s decisions and make deliberately provocative choices, they decide to have a simple wedding at City Hall. As they wait their turn, Sheldon changes his mind and decides he wants a first dance with Amy at a real wedding.
On October 9, 2007, a full-length (1 minute and 45 seconds) version of the song was released commercially.[27] Although some unofficial pages identify the song title as "History of Everything,"[28] the cover art for the single identifies the title as "Big Bang Theory Theme." A music video also was released via special features on The Complete Fourth Season DVD and Blu-ray set.[29][30] The theme was included on the band's greatest hits album, Hits from Yesterday & the Day Before, released on September 27, 2011.[31] In September 2015, TMZ uncovered court documents showing that Steven Page sued former bandmate Robertson over the song, alleging that he was promised 20% of the proceeds, but that Robertson has kept that money entirely for himself.[32]
Sheldon and Amy are surprised to find that Wil Wheaton's new Professor Proton show is actually very entertaining and that Wil had Howard on as a guest. On Howard's suggestion, Sheldon apologizes to Wil, mending their friendship, and tells him he wants to be on the show; but Wil asks for Amy. Sheldon tells her to do it, but she says she often doesn't do things to avoid upsetting him. Sheldon is horrified when he realises how selfish he has been, especially when he finds out that the men do the same for him. Sheldon encourages Amy to go on the show to inspire girls to pursue science while trying to control his obvious jealousy for her. Meanwhile, Leonard writes a book about a physicist that solves a murder, the protagonist Logan Dean is based on himself. Bernadette points out Logan's mean boss Illsa is similar to Penny, who thinks it is based on Bernadette, though Leonard does not correct her. However, Bernadette tells Penny the truth, upsetting her and making her mad at Leonard. After calling his mother for advice, Leonard learns that Illsa is actually like her; but abandons the book when he realizes he wrote romantic tension into the relationship between the characters.
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