The Big Bang Theory is an American comedy television series created and executively produced by Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady. Like the name of the series itself (with the exception of the first episode "Pilot"), episode titles of The Big Bang Theory always start with "The" and resemble the name of a scientific principle, theory or experiment, whimsically referencing a plot point or quirk in that episode.
When Amy sees Sheldon obsessively tying and untying his bow tie the day before their wedding, Amy tells him it doesn't need to be even because sometimes a little asymmetry looks good. On the day of the wedding, Sheldon stops his mother from trying to straighten his bow tie, saying it's supposed to be a little asymmetrical. When Mary comments that sometimes it’s the imperfect stuff that makes things perfect, Sheldon has a flash of inspiration and rushes to see Amy. Sheldon and Amy’s wedding is delayed as they excitedly work on a new theory of “super asymmetry”.
In scenes set at Howard's home, he interacts with his rarely-seen mother (voiced by Carol Ann Susi until her death) by shouting from room to room in the house. She similarly interacts with other characters in this manner.[85] She reflects the Jewish mother stereotype in some ways, such as being overly controlling of Howard's adult life and sometimes trying to make him feel guilty about causing her trouble. She is dependent on Howard, as she requires him to help her with her wig and makeup in the morning. Howard, in turn, is attached to his mother to the point where she still cuts his meat for him, takes him to the dentist, does his laundry and "grounds" him when he returns home after briefly moving out.[86] Until Howard's marriage to Bernadette in the fifth-season finale, Howard's former living situation led Leonard's psychiatrist mother to speculate that he may suffer from some type of pathology,[87] and Sheldon to refer to their relationship as Oedipal.[88] In season 8, Howard's mother dies in her sleep while in Florida, which devastates Howard and Stuart, who briefly lived with Mrs. Wolowitz.
I agree with Jeff. The finale was hardly “perfect”. I thought they took the safest route possible; and there were only a few good laughs. Some of it was predictable; winning the Nobel and fixing the elevator. The prize ceremony wasn’t even particularly interesting. Having each friend stand and be recognized at a Nobel ceremony seemed way of place…even for Sheldon. The writers were obviously struggling this last season for new material , and the finale was no exception. I still think Raj should have ended up with ‘someone’, as they felt the need to pair everyone else off during the series. (Even Stuart got a girl.). All in all, I found the finale wanting. I thought going in that I might burn it to DVD as an episode to keep to watch again. I’ll pass.
The Big Bang Theory started off slowly in the ratings, failing to make the top 50 in its first season (ranking 68th), and ranking 40th in its second season. When the third season premiered on September 21, 2009, however, The Big Bang Theory ranked as CBS's highest-rated show of that evening in the adults 18–49 demographic (4.6/10) along with a then-series-high 12.83 million viewers.[94] After the first three seasons aired at different times on Monday nights, CBS moved the show to Thursdays at 8:00 ET for the 2010–2011 schedule, to be in direct competition with NBC's Comedy Block and Fox's American Idol (then the longest reigning leading primetime show on U.S. television from 2004 to 2011).[95] During its fourth season, it became television's highest rated comedy, just barely beating out eight-year champ Two and a Half Men. However, in the age 18–49 demographic (the show's target age range), it was the second highest rated comedy, behind ABC's Modern Family. The fifth season opened with viewing figures of over 14 million.[96]
With Melissa Rauch saying goodbye to Bernadette Rostenkowski-Wolowitz after joining the show in season three and becoming a series regular in season four, she's already begun to carve out new gigs. Not only did her indie film Ode to Joy make its film festival debut this part April, but she has another film, Steven Soderbergh's The Laundromat co-starring none other than Meryl Streep, in post-production, due for a 2019 release. While wrapping up filming on TBBT, she landed her next TV gig, playing Shira, wife of Paul Scheer's Keith on Showtime's recent Wall Street comedy Black Sunday. With the show recently renewed for a second season to debut on the cable net in 2020, it's looking likely she'll be back with greater availability.
I agree with Jeff. The finale was hardly “perfect”. I thought they took the safest route possible; and there were only a few good laughs. Some of it was predictable; winning the Nobel and fixing the elevator. The prize ceremony wasn’t even particularly interesting. Having each friend stand and be recognized at a Nobel ceremony seemed way of place…even for Sheldon. The writers were obviously struggling this last season for new material , and the finale was no exception. I still think Raj should have ended up with ‘someone’, as they felt the need to pair everyone else off during the series. (Even Stuart got a girl.). All in all, I found the finale wanting. I thought going in that I might burn it to DVD as an episode to keep to watch again. I’ll pass.
After Sheldon reminds the guys about the time they mined Bitcoin without him, the guys go on a quest to find their suddenly valuable missing cryptocurrency. They realize the currency is on a laptop which Leonard gave to Penny when they dating, which she then gave to her ex-boyfriend Zack. After Leonard and Penny go to Zack's apartment, he shows them a seven-year-old video that Penny recorded on the laptop soon after she broke up with Leonard. Leonard is touched by the video which shows a drunk Penny lamenting the break-up of her relationship with him.
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